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Tuesday, February 7

  1. page home edited Horizon Archive of the Horizon Report: K12 The generous support of HP's Office of Global Soci…

    HorizonArchive of the Horizon Report: K12
    The generous support of HP's Office of Global Social Innovation
    makes this research possible and is thankfully acknowledged.
    (view changes)
    9:43 pm
  2. page Wireless Power edited What is Wireless Power? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]] Any…

    What is Wireless Power?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Anyone who attends a class or meeting where most of the participants have laptop computers is well aware that there are never enough power outlets—and when they are available, they are invariably located in inconvenient places. Wireless power, already being prototyped by several companies, promises to alleviate the problem by making power for charging batteries in devices readily available. Using near-field inductive coupling, power can be transmitted through special surfaces or even through open space to charge devices within a home, office, school, or other setting. Consumer products are already entering the market; the Powermat, for instance, charges up to three devices placed onto its surface (each device must first be slipped into a compatible sleeve). Fulton Innovation's eCoupled technology is designed to be built into desk- and countertops, enabling not only power transfer but other wireless communications between devices placed on the surfaces. Witricity is developing transmitters that would be embedded in walls or other furniture, transferring power via inductive coupling to receivers attached to devices anywhere within the home or classroom.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 25, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    I'm skeptical about wireless power. I have little doubt that 1:1 computing will be in the classroom very soon. And the technology to make an educational device's battery last through the day will either be unavailable or prohibitively expensive (given a school or student's budget). That leaves power-to-the-desk as the only reasonable solution. Powermats and the like work quite well since the power only has to be transmitted wirelessly over a very short distance (millimeters). However, I'm concerned about wireless transmission of power over greater distance (e.g. from the wall). The losses may be quite large (not good for the environment) and I'm always concerned about what happens to the human body when placed between an energy source and its destination. Even if I'm wrong and it's perfectly safe, there will be controversy. The amount of power transmitted by a cell phone is a tiny fraction of that needed to charge an iPad and yet the studies of cell phone safety remain inconclusive. For powermats to work, wired power has to reach the desk. In that case, it's almost as convenient and less expensive to just place a conventional outlet there. For these reasons, I don't think wireless power will have a significant impact on education in the next decade. brandt.redd Feb 18, 2011
    I agree with Brandt about the concerns with wireless power on the human body. There is a great need, though, for different ways to power our mobile devices. Batteries are also a huge environmental concern to me too. I believe that innovation in this area will be the next catalyst for improved technology and economic growth. alice.owenalice.owen Feb 19, 2011
    Agree with both - very good points indeed. There is a noticeable improvement in battery life and energy-efficient components/devices. Some full-function notebooks with decent screen size of 12inches can already last beyond 6 hrs. horncheah Feb 26, 2011
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  3. page WhatsNew edited What's New? The wiki that will produce the Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition is now open. Look …

    What's New?
    The wiki that will produce the Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition is now open. Look for more integration with the NMC's new powerful resource, Horizon Project Navigator http://navigator.nmc.org/
    We've completed the research collection phase, and the first round of rankings is complete. See the tallies.
    The 2011 Horizon K12 Shortlist is ready! Get the 2011 Horizon K12 Short List.
    We're all done! Get the NMC Horizon Report > 2011 K12 Edition!

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    9:42 pm
  4. page Web Aggregation Tools edited What are Web Aggregation Tools? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"…

    What are Web Aggregation Tools?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Aggregation is the process of transparently gathering together distributed pieces of online content based on an interest in the topic(s), the author(s), or other shared characteristics. RSS readers are one way to aggregate data, but with the increase in personal publishing, new tools for aggregation are emerging. Using these tools, readers can easily track a distributed conversation that takes place across blogs, Twitter, and other publishing platforms, as well as pull in relevant resources from news feeds and other sources.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 25, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Use of this technology may reduce "noise" around a particular area of interest by allowing focussed searching of trusted sources. If appropriate functionality is provided, web aggregation tools may allow analysis that develops insight both from the aggregation of data and from the searches made.Gavin Feb 17, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    I like what Clay Shirky says, in that the issue is not information overload but rather filter failure. Teaching how to filter (RSS, aggregation, smart searches) is a key digital literacy. bwatwood Feb 20, 2011. Agreed with filter failure, but it's probably a combination of both horncheah Feb 26, 2011
    This can potentially be very important as the need to filter information will be increasingly critical. horncheah Feb 26, 2011
    Aggregation pulls together information and data for a common theme but doesn't necessarily reduce the noise. Take for example Google analytics, some schools are starting to explore the use of such tools and be able to pull information together. But to be able to decipher, filter and interpret is truly a next generation skill. Other tools like Wolfram|Alpha is a good example of positive aggregation that has been beneficial in education. adrian.lim Feb 27, 2011
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    A stronger emphasis needs to be put on aggregation as RSS vs aggregation using a tool like LibGuides or Netvibes to distribute information to students. Personal curation of information can be supported by teachers 'pushing' information out for students and teachers. Web Aggregation can be a very strong way of supporting and/or chronicling student learning http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/media21 http://theunquietlibrary.libguides.com/content.php?pid=164323&sid=1386412judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    I would agree with Judy...the other piece to this is the curation that goes hand in hand with aggregation. I'm not sure the two should be separated at this point. It's one thing to collect, it's another to sift and select and synthesize. will.richardson Feb 26, 2011
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    There is potential for rapid and reliable insight into specific subjects, as well as up to the minute access to most recent postings, of particular interest where the subject is changing rapidly, or events are in some way adding to the body of knowledge Gavin Feb 17, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    I've always thought aggregation was a big deal and haven't really understood the slow uptake. But again, classroom teachers and educators in general have very little context for what this means and how it can be used, and to be honest, I don't see much movement in that direction. will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I agree - in my work with teachers I have found slow uptake in use of tools to aggregate despite the clear value for currency. Perhaps it's something to do with the syllabus core content - until that is unleashed from 'text book' learning, aggregation will play second fiddle. judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Futurelab's Education Eye was a Becta funded project "to explore mobilising technology leadership in education" see http://www.futurelab.org.uk/resources/education-eye. Taking a specific subject area, a group of expert curators identifies important sources, whether twitter, blogs or web sites. These are then presented to the user/searcher in through an engaging interface. New instances of Education Eye can be developed for new subject areas through an appropriate curating group, and back end tools can be used to analyse the data that arises from the resulting web aggregation Gavin Feb 17, 2011 * add your response here* [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  5. page Watch Lists edited [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav" ]] Press Clippings: Publi…
    [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav" ]]
    Press Clippings: Published Technologies to Watch Lists
    This area is a place to collect "Technologies to Watch" lists published by other organizations. Though these lists and publications may serve a different audience and purpose than the Horizon Report does, they contain many useful descriptions and discussions that can and should inform our work. This initial listing represents the newest items from the Horizon Project Navigator Library (explore more Technologies to Watch Lists)
    We'd love to see your additions here as well! Please use the edit this page button to add an item, or add comments on how or why you think they may or may not be important. As is the convention throughout the Horizon Project Wiki, we ask you to mark items you think are of high interest to this project, as I have done here by typing 4 tilde (~) characters-- larry Jan 27, 2011This will help us to sift through the articles and determine which ones resonate most strongly with the board as a whole.
    Recommended Reading
    Xplana Education and Technology Trends 2011
    http://blog.xplana.com/education-and-technology-trends-2011/
    This blog post from Xplana gives a rundown of the technologies they predict will have an impact in 2011. They offer five broad areas to watch with specific topics listed under each broad topic. KeeneH Feb 7, 2011 will.richardson Feb 17, 2011Gavin Feb 18, 2011Like the gathering of technologies under the five broad areas bwatwood Feb 20, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011oystein.johannessen Feb 22, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    virginie.aimard Feb 21, 2011 horncheah Feb 23, 2011
    Gartner Highlights Key Predictions for IT Organizations and Users in 2010 and Beyond
    http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1278413
    Gartner Research makes some long range predictions for trends impacting IT organizations and technology users. These include:
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    By 2012, 20 percent of businesses will own no IT assets
    By 2012, India-centric IT services companies will represent 20 percent of the leading cloud aggregators in the market.
    By 2012, Facebook will become the hub for social network integration and Web socialization
    By 2014, most IT business cases will include carbon remediation costs,
    In 2012, 60 percent of a new PC's total life greenhouse gas emissions will have occurred before the user first turns the machine on.
    Internet marketing will be regulated by 2015, controlling more than $250 billion in Internet marketing spending worldwide.
    By 2014, over 3 billion of the world's adult population will be able to transact electronically via mobile or Internet technology.
    By 2014, there will be a 90% mobile penetration rate and 6.5 billion mobile connections.
    By 2015, context will be as influential to mobile consumer services and relationships as search engines are to the Web.
    By 2013, mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access device worldwide. KeeneH Feb 8, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 16, 2011Gavin Feb 18, 2011important because it compellingly translates trends into predicted overall statistical outcomes cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011oystein.johannessen Feb 22, 2011
    keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011 horncheah Feb 23, 2011Allanah.King Feb 28, 2011
    5 Higher Ed Tech Trends To Watch in 2011
    http://campustechnology.com/articles/2010/12/09/5-higher-ed-tech-trends-to-watch-in-2011.aspx
    Campus Technology looks at five trends to watch in 2011. These include increased cloud computing, more mobile computing, the proliferation of wireless, a possible retreat from some technology, and the rise in online eduction as a viable option over physically attending classes. While focused on higher education, these trends can provide a possible blueprint for emerging technologies having an impact on K12. judy.oconnell Feb 12, 2011leslie.conery Feb 16, 2011 will.richardson Feb 17, 2011mscofino Feb 18, 2011 bwatwood Feb 20, 2011Allanah.King Feb 28, 2011
    keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    ReadWriteWeb's 2011 Staff Predictions
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/2011_staff_predictions.php
    The experienced staff at the influential blog ReadWriteWeb have listed their varied tech predictions for 2011. Some serious, some more light, they all offer some food for thought.will.richardson Feb 17, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    Five Online Media Trends for 2011
    http://thenextweb.com/media/2011/01/02/5-online-media-trends-for-2011/
    The NextWeb lists five trends for online media in 2011. These include cloud-based media libraries, a more readable web, and a shakeout in the ebook/ereader market. KeeneH Feb 7, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 12, 2011 bwatwood Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    virginie.aimard Feb 21, 2011
    Seven Important Social Media Trends For The Next Year (2011)
    http://thenextweb.com/socialmedia/2010/09/12/seven-important-social-media-trends-for-the-next-year/
    The NextWeb previews seven trends specific to social media for 2011. These include branded content, the emergence of micropayments, and the rise of question and answer websites such as Quora. will.richardson Feb 17, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    Gartner Identifies the Top 10 Strategic Technologies for 2011
    http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1454221
    Gartner Research's main strategic technologies for 2011. These include the further maturation and adoption of the following: cloud computing, mobile applications and media tablets, increased use of video, next generation analytics, social media analytics, context-aware computing, storage class memory (flash memory), ubiquitous computing, and fabric-based infrastructure and computers. KeeneH Feb 7, 2011leslie.conery Feb 16, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 16, 2011mscofino Feb 18, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011 horncheah Feb 23, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    Seven Technologies That Will Rock 2011
    http://techcrunch.com/2011/01/02/seven-technologies-that-will-rock-2011/
    TechCrunch predicts seven technologies that will have in impact in 2011. The leading contenders are web video on your tv, the rise of Quora, more mobile social photo apps, the streaming cloud and context-aware apps among others. KeeneH Feb 7, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    5 Web Technologies and Trends to Watch in 2011
    http://mashable.com/2011/01/05/web-technologies-2011/
    Mashable gives a rundown of the five web technologies they feel will have an impact in 2011. This list is more geared towards developers and programmers. These are: jQuery Mobile, Hardware-Accelerated Web Browsers, Node.js and Server Side JavaScript, Real-Time Clickstream Sharing, and NoSQL Databases.
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    WIS Technology Consultants Technology Trends To Watch: 2011-2020
    http://wistechnology.com/articles/8210/
    The WTN Media offers their broad predictions for the next ten years from their analysts and CIO's. Technologies to watch include: cloud computing, privacy mobility, contextual web, CIO's future role, enterprise applications (ERP), diminishing use of email, big data, technology education, and next generation sourcing.
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    5 Significant Trends for 2011
    http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/352068/5_Trends_to_Watch_in_2011
    Analysts at ComputerWorld offer their thoughts on five trends having an impact in 2011. Some of these borrow from others such as Gartner Research. This offers a nice overview of the major trends. judy.oconnell Feb 12, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    Five Overhyped Tech Trends for 2011
    http://www.nytimes.com/external/venturebeat/2011/01/28/28venturebeat-five-overhyped-tech-trends-for-2011-18338.html
    The New York Times offers a list of overhyped tech trends for 2011 but also offers five trends that are worth noting and watching more closely. This is authored by Bill Predmore via VentureBeat on NYTimes.com. KeeneH Feb 7, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    100 Things to Watch in 2011
    http://www.slideshare.net/jwtintelligence/2f-100-things-to-watch-in-2011-6306251
    JWT Intelligence, part of JWT Marketing Communications, offers a visual journey of 100 trends to keep your eye on for 2011. Presented through SlideShare, it offers a glimpse of what to expect. KeeneH Feb 7, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 12, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Feb 8 , 2011)
    IBM Next 5 in 5
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anKiEoxkpxM
    This three minute video from IBM Labs gives an overview of five technologies that will have an impact over the next five years. A key area mentioned is the rise of sensors in mobile devices that can enable a new generation of citizen scientists to provide information to scientists. Battery technology, geolocation, more energy efficient devices and new ways to communicate via teleprescence and video are other areas poised to have an impact. alan Feb 7, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 12, 2011mscofino Feb 18, 2011Gavin Feb 19, 2011 bwatwood Feb 20, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Jan 7, 2011)
    Technology trends for 2011
    http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/technology/technology-trends-for-2011_508605.ht...
    Trends for 2011 include social networking entering enterprise, cloud computing becoming more established, usability becoming more streamlined and integration of mobile devices into the cloud and convergence with social networking. These are all covered in this prediction post from MoneyControl.com.
    (Added to Navigator Jan 7, 2011)
    10 Ways Social Media Will Change in 2011
    http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/10_ways_social_media_will_change_in_2011.ph...
    This post goes into detail about the trends to expect with social media in 2011. This area will be a driving force in technology and will impact a number of areas such as video, mobiles, and deeper integration into businesses and society. The top ten trends are explained and analyzed in this piece setting up an interesting stage to watch at 2011 gets underway.
    horncheah Feb 23, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Dec 15, 2010)
    Five K-12 Technology Trends for 2011
    http://thejournal.com/articles/2010/12/02/5-k12-technology-trends-for-2011.aspx
    The Journal lists five trends for 2011 related to instructional technology. Mobile technology, more web based instruction and more analytical tools lead the charge.
    horncheah Feb 23, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Dec 6, 2010)
    Nine Things You Need To Know About 4G Networks
    http://www.appolicious.com/finance/articles/3426-nine-things-you-need-to-know-ab...
    This post look at the important aspects of emerging 4G mobile networks. These promise much faster speeds enabling mobile devices to do more work similar to standard desktop systems. The article explains the important points about 4G and what we need to know about this emerging technology. alan Feb 7, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Oct 20, 2010)
    5 Trends that Will Shape the Next Few Years of Social Media
    http://thenextweb.com/socialmedia/2010/09/19/5-trends-that-will-shape-the-next-f...
    We’ve gazed into crystal ball and considered how we think these technologies will combine to become such an established fabric of our lives that in the next few years what we’ve written here won’t be considered amazing at all.
    (Added to Navigator Sep 20, 2010)
    The social Web in 2010: The Emerging Standards and Technologies to Watch
    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hinchcliffe/the-social-web-in-2010-the-emerging-standa...
    Analyst Dion Hinchcliffe at ZDnet offers a take on what social computing standards and services will evolve over the next year.
    (Added to Navigator Sep 13, 2010) judy.oconnell Feb 12, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    Tablet Wars: The 12 Biggest iPad Rivals
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/35989025?slide=1
    Twelve tablets -- other than the iPad -- are reviewed in this article.cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Sep 13, 2010)
    Location-Based Services in 2014
    http://geothought.blogspot.com/2009/10/location-based-services-in-2014-part-1.ht...
    An analyst gives his take on which location based services will make inroads and become established over the next five years.
    (Added to Navigator Sep 13, 2010)
    Gartner Identifies the Top 10 Strategic Technologies for 2010
    http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1210613
    Gartner Research lists their top strategic technologies for 2010. Cloud, mobile and social computing are among the technologies they target. alan Feb 7, 2011leslie.conery Feb 16, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 16, 2011Gavin Feb 19, 2011 bwatwood Feb 20, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Sep 13, 2010)
    keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011
    New Directions and a New Decade for E-Learning: 12 Predictions
    http://elearnqueen.blogspot.com/2010/01/new-directions-and-new-decade-for-e.html
    The new decade will be a time of great change in e-learning, and we're already getting a glimpse of it. Many of the changes are driven by new technologies, but even more are emerging in the aftermath of economic crisis, and the changes in the way people work, interact, and obtain information. bwatwood Feb 20, 2011
    (Added to Navigator Sep 13, 2010)
    (explore more Technologies to Watch Lists)

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  6. page Visual Data Analysis edited What is Visual Data Analysis? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]…

    What is Visual Data Analysis?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Visual data analysis blends highly advanced computational methods with sophisticated graphics engines to tap the extraordinary ability of humans to see patterns and structure in even the most complex visual presentations. Currently applied to massive, heterogeneous, and dynamic datasets, such as those generated in studies of astrophysical, fluidic, biological, and other complex processes, the techniques have become sophisticated enough to allow the interactive manipulation of variables in real time with compelling results. Ultra high-resolution displays allow teams of researchers to zoom into interesting aspects of the renderings, or to navigate along interesting visual pathways, following their intuitions and even hunches to see where they may lead. New research is now beginning to apply these sorts of tools to the social sciences as well, and the techniques offer considerable promise in helping us understand complex social processes like learning, political and organizational change, and the diffusion of knowledge.
    Over the past century, data collection, storage, transmission, and display has changed dramatically, and scholars have undergone a profound transformation in the way they approach data-related tasks. Data collection and compilation is no longer the tedious, manual process it once was, and tools to analyse, interpret, and display data are increasingly sophisticated, and their use routine in many disciplines. The options for illustrating trends, relationships, and cause and effect have exploded, and it is now a relatively simple matter for anyone to do the sorts of analyses that were once only the province of statisticians and engineers.
    In advanced research settings, scientists and others studying massively complex systems generate mountains of data, and have developed a wide variety of new tools and techniques to allow those data to be interpreted holistically, and to expose meaningful patterns and structure, trends and exceptions, and more. Researchers that work with data sets from experiments or simulations, such as computational fluid dynamics, astrophysics, climate study, or medicine draw on techniques from the study of visualization, data mining, and statistics to create useful ways to investigate and understand what they have found.
    The blending of these disciplines has given rise to the new field of visual data analysis, which is not only characterized by its focus on making use of the pattern matching skills that seem to be hard-wired into the human brain, but also in the way in which it facilitates the work of teams collaborating to tease out meaning from complex sets of information. While the most sophisticated tools are still mostly found in research settings, a variety of tools are emerging that make it possible for almost anyone with an analytical bent to easily interpret all sorts of data.
    Self-organizing maps are an approach that mimics the way our brains organize multi-faceted relationships; they create a grid of "neuronal units" such that neighbouring units recognize similar data, reinforcing important patterns so that they can be seen. Cluster analysis is a set of mathematical techniques for partitioning a series of data objects into a smaller amount of groups, or clusters, so that the data objects within one cluster are more similar to each other than to those in other clusters. Visual, interactive principal components analysis is a technique once only available to statisticians that is now commonly used to identify hidden trends and data correlations in multidimensional data sets. Gapminder (http://www.gapminder.org/), for example, uses this approach in its analysis of multivariate datasets over time.
    These sorts of tools are now finding their way into common use in many other disciplines, where the analytical needs are not necessarily computational; visualization techniques have even begun to emerge for textual analysis and basic observation. Many are free or very inexpensive, bringing the ability to engage in rich visual interpretation to virtually anyone.
    Online services such as Many Eyes, Wordle, Flowing Data, and Gapminder accept uploaded data and allow the user to configure the output to varying degrees. Many Eyes, for instance, allows people to learn how to create visualizations, to share and visualize their own data, and to create new visualizations from data contributed by others. Some, like Roambi, have mobile counterparts, making it easy to carry interactive, visual representations of data wherever one goes. Even quite public data, such as the posts made in Twitter, can be rendered visually to reveal creative insights. For instance, the New Political Interfaces project visualized political topics from 2009 as expressed on Twitter, charting which topics were — and were not — being discussed by politicians, news outlets, and other sources.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 25, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    If we can continue to build our content around visuals (www.latoyaegwuekwe.com/geographyofarecession.html ), just imagine how we can shift the time spent on teaching/sharing the content and have that time replaced teaching critical/analytical thinking, synthesis and evaluation. (michael.lambert Feb 20, 2011)
    Since the educational enterprise, from cognition to educational systems, is complex with many things going on in an integrated fashion, visual representations that can simplify and make more efficient our understanding of what is going on is truly important. This means from an individual student metacognitively wrestling with concepts and their own progress to administrators trying to monitor and constantly improve their system.chris.brown Feb 21, 2011
    This technology can provide new ways of working in several areas of the educational sector; learners, teachers or other facilitators of learning, and researchers and evaluators. It will require shifts at any place in this system, but some of the representations can be so compelling, the shift to the technology can be supported by the technology itself.jeanne.century Feb 21, 2011
    Working with such a wide variety of individuals and institutions from the educational sector, in-field practitioner community, policy making and research community, often times the structural element is lost. Using visual data analysis could enable partner organizations to easily grasp the complex and nuanced interconnectedness between all parties involved.
    virginie.aimard Feb 22, 2011
    I am not sure this is framed completely right, but do believe that using data to inform classroom practice is probably the most important trend...and that is enabled by a variety of new technologies. keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011 I am not seeing the section on data analytics on wiki, but that is what I guess I am arguing for.
    This might provide for a useful collaborative environment where visualisation of diffictult scientific concepts can be co-constructed amongst fellow learners and students. horncheah Feb 26, 2011
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    This is very much linked to another area on this wiki - the area of data analytics. That relationship should be addressed. chris.brown Feb 21, 2011
    add your response here
    New trends in linking traditional Student Information Systems with Content Management Systems...linking data to instructional strategies/interventions. keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    If there was easy access to visuals and they were categorized in some format for educators, this would reduce my ‘search/google’ time and allow me to focus on how to help students use the information to think critically and synthesize. (michael.lambert Feb 20, 2011)
    I think this can be very impactful for students monitoring their own progress, students and teachers investigatiing issues through project based learning that utilizes large data sets and for administrators looking to continously improve their systems. I also think this will be a key tool for an educational epidemiological discipline that I think will emerge in 5-10 years. For more on this, please see my comments on Data Analytics.chris.brown Feb 21, 2011
    I agree with Chris above. Also, this technology can play an important role in engaging learners who don't necessarily consider themselves STEM oriented. Data visualizations provide ways of processing information that appeal to learners with different kinds of sensibilities and can provide ways to bridge for them interactions with data. jeanne.century Feb 21, 2011
    Apart from the obvious, students will have the ability to see structural relationships that prior they could not visualize on their own, they themselves, once familiarized with visual data analysis tools, will be able to move ideas from their personal visualizations into a computerized form for their fellow students to see. This kind of technology is not just limited to STEM applications or social sciences, but could also be applicable to the arts. Granted where the STEMs are concerned, it would be nice to have ‘virtual dissections’ take the place of animal dissections in high school anatomy courses.
    virginie.aimard Feb 22, 2011
    Enormous potential. We don't lack data in education. but, we lack what to do with the data to inform instruction. The more it can be easily visualized for teachers/principals...and especially STUDENTS, the more high performing educational system we will have. keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Have a look at this article and its projects: www.nytimes.com/2010/11/17/arts/17digital.html Need to teach current events? Try using this visual site: http://tenbyten.org/info.html Again, this will help students narrow their focus/search and reduce time to some degree. And what if at the end of class each day we could ask students their biggest learning for the day, similar to this site: www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/11/01/us/politics/2010-election-wordtrain.html (michael.lambert Feb 20, 2011)
    I think the work of Erin Reilly and others at the New Media Literacies project at USC is very interesting. Here is an amazing example of what can be done with data visualization http://www.gapminder.org/world/#$majorMode=chart$is;shi=t;ly=2003;lb=f;il=t;fs=11;al=30;stl=t;st=t;nsl=t;se=t$wst;tts=C$ts;sp=5.59290322580644;ti=2009$zpv;v=0$inc_x;mmid=XCOORDS;iid=phAwcNAVuyj1jiMAkmq1iMg;by=ind$inc_y;mmid=YCOORDS;iid=phAwcNAVuyj2tPLxKvvnNPA;by=ind$inc_s;uniValue=8.21;iid=phAwcNAVuyj0XOoBL%5Fn5tAQ;by=ind$inc_c;uniValue=255;gid=CATID0;by=grp$map_x;scale=log;dataMin=295;dataMax=79210$map_y;scale=lin;dataMin=19;dataMax=86$map_s;sma=49;smi=2.65$cd;bd=0$inds=;example=75 chris.brown Feb 21, 2011
    Gates Foundation is funding lots of work around this. Stay tuned. keith.krueger Feb 22, 2011
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  7. page Virtual Worlds edited What are Virtual Worlds? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]] Vi…

    What are Virtual Worlds?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Virtual worlds are richly immersive and highly scalable 2- or 3-D environments. Most, but not all virtual worlds are multi-user spaces, meaning that many people can be in the same virtual space and interact with one another in real time, generally through a representation of themselves as an avatar. While many popular games take place in virtual worlds, virtual worlds are not themselves games. They are social environments over which a physical context can be laid. The most successful in an educational context are flexible spaces, and as such, it is quite common to find professional development activities like conferences and meetings taking place in settings such as Second Life®, Project Wonderland, OpenSim, Qwak, Active Worlds, and other immersive environments.
    The capability of virtual worlds has expanded considerably in the past few years, with enormous development in building tools, climate simulators, physics engines, and the overall capability of these platforms to simulate reality. Gartner Research, Inc. has estimated that by 2011, 80% of Internet users will have an avatar in a virtual world, and hundreds of platforms to allow those avatars places to interact are already available or in development. Virtually every higher education institution has some sort of work going in around virtual spaces, and in just one platform alone, Linden Lab’s Second Life®, thousands of educational projects and experiments are actively underway.
    Over the past few years, as hundreds of colleges and universities have begun to experiment with these spaces, and as more educational, professional, and commercial activities have taken place in such environments, our understanding of how these spaces are used and why they are effective has grown apace. While some immersive platforms are essentially analogs to physical spaces and thus primarily used for modeling and prototyping (SketchUp or Maya, for example), the greatest growth by far has been at the intersection of virtual worlds and social networking. The most successful spaces capitalize on this trend, and include common social networking tools such as profiles, the ability to locate friends within the environment, customizable personas (avatars), and methods for communicating both synchronously and asynchronously. Tools like these support projects and educational gatherings in virtual worlds by enabling people to share space at a distance, which in turn facilitates the formation of social groups.
    It has become evident that people generally return to virtual spaces because of the experiences they find there, not because of the spaces themselves. While the physicality of the space may excite initial curiosity and interest, the ongoing attraction of any virtual space is its community — the people that use the space. The space itself, while important, is a secondary attraction. Part of the reasons for this is that convening a group in a virtual world is a palpably different experience from participating in other real-time communication forums, and people !nd they like the feeling of connection. When people choose to simultaneously inhabit the same space at the same time, as happens in virtual world gatherings, meetings take on a deeper dimension, with a great many parallels to face-to-face gatherings. As a result, it is very common to see the average time per visit to a socially focused virtual space approach 60 minutes or more. This is true even when measured over tens of thousands of visits.
    Sophisticated toolkits are being developed to support collaboration at a distance within virtual environments. Specially designed immersive workspaces are emerging that combine familiar collaboration tools with virtual spaces, integrating the comparatively new activity of meeting in virtual worlds with long-established patterns of working at a distance. A product developed by Rivers Run Red and Linden Lab, for example, offers an immersive workspace environment that uses the web and the virtual world of Second Life to integrate productivity applications, online meeting spaces, and communication tools (http://riversrunred.com/immersive-workspaces/). Similar efforts are underway at Sun Microsystems and other organizations, indicating that virtual worlds are likely to continue to grow as a platform for distance collaboration.
    With more widespread use has also come increased demand for content and for tools to create content. Since this topic was first addressed in the 2007 Horizon Report, we have witnessed enormous development in building tools, climate simulators, physics engines, and the overall capability of these platforms to simulate reality. There is increasing activity in this space; Gartner, Inc. has estimated that by 2011, 80% of Internet users will have an avatar in a virtual world, and hundreds of platforms are already available or in development. Interoperability is the next major goal for the industry; work is underway to connect different worlds with one another for seamless transition between them; prototypes of virtual world clients are emerging for mobile devices and the web. The market for virtual worlds is undergoing tremendous growth, and we can expect considerable improvements in system capability, interoperability between systems, and interoperability of development tools in coming years.
    Increased capability goes hand in hand with increased demand for processing power and bandwidth. In Australia in particular, the policy implications of these requirements have hampered acceptance and use, and are likely to continue to be a factor. Virtual worlds and immersive spaces require fairly sophisticated computers and a not-insignificant amount of bandwidth. Those requirements will continue and increase as environments become progressively more realistic.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 25, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Virtual worlds provide innovate spaces for exploration of ideas, engaging new levels of creativity, and allowing collaboration both within and beyond the school. They make online learning personal, interactive, and visual and so allow students to extend learning in ways not possible with any other online collaboration tools. judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    We have seen advances in the game industry, which three dimensional (3D) game systems such as Microsoft Xbox and Sony Play Station 2 allow thousands of people to interact in the same virtual space simultaneously. School-going children today are fascinated with the moving images, immediate gratification and the interactivity nature found in these games. The virtual world is part of the air they breathe and students are at ease in that environment to learn. limad Feb 26, 2011
    I think virtual worlds have considerable potential for school education, although Second Life strictly is an adult environment. As with any technology, it's not a silver bullet, but located inside a carefully thought through program of learning, I can see it being a potentially powerful technology for education. I think it's relevant because it incorporates multimedia with social networking; where children, meet , learn and play. The 'real time' characteristics of virtual worlds, I think, is one its characteristics that makes it amenable to educational purposes.kathryn.moyle Feb 26, 2011
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Is it worth noting that opensim (e.g. Reactiongrid) allows schools to run virtual worlds on their own servers, or to host open and closed environments hosted by organisations like ReactionGrid? judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    Hypergrid - and the ability to move between one opensim world to another. http://opensimulator.org/wiki/Hypergrid http://thejournal.com/articles/2011/01/11/next-stop-open-sim.aspx http://www.jokaydiagrid.com/judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    I can foresee a time when schools will be able to use virtual worlds interfaces as part of their enrolment, induction and other administration roles.kathryn.moyle Feb 26, 2011
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    I think that there is a huge opportunity to focus on creativity that combines visual, spacial, and complex design principles while also intersecting with the particular curriculum topic being explored. judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    This is still a new frontier for teachers, while students are already interacting in virtual worlds e.g. club penguin. The lack of inclusion of virtual worlds will continue to stifle key elements and options for learning - a potential negative impact. judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    Virtual worlds provide huge opportunities to develop subject-based simulation games embedded with virtual assessment of skills such as thinking, communication, questioning and adaptability. limad Feb 26, 2011
    It adds to the quality of distance education tools by creating educational spaces in another, virtual world. Although on a bit of a tangent - having just spent two days bunked down avoiding a cyclone and its immediate aftermath, and still with Internet access, it could be there is potential for a 'safe cognitive space' while events like wild weather are about.kathryn.moyle Feb 26, 2011
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Many schools have adopted Open Sim at http://reactiongrid.com/ to explore virtual learning. http://begoniaisland.edublogs.org/
    Jokaydia grid http://www.jokaydiagrid.com/ judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011
    Quest Atlantis http://atlantis.crlt.indiana.edu/ and River City http://muve.gse.harvard.edu/rivercityproject/index.html are excellent examples of Multi-User Virtual Environments. Chris Dede at the Harvard School of Education a leading researcher in this area.brandt.redd Feb 27, 2011
    The following Second Life projects (see youtube videos) from my school provides examples of how Second Life is used to enage students in Art, Social Emotional Learning and Olympic Values learning in Ngee Ann Secondary School.
    (1) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uW9qBlzETE
    (2) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3g24rXecJo&feature=related
    (3) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noeADJU4_uU
    limad Feb 26, 2011

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  8. page Twitter edited Horizon Report in Twitter Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Rep…

    Horizon Report in Twitter
    Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Report.

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  9. page Trends edited Research Question 4: Key Trends What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the w…

    Research Question 4: Key Trends
    What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the ways in which learning-focused institutions approach our core missions of teaching, research, and service?
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Jan 27, 2010
    Compose your entries like this:
    Trend Name. Add your ideas here with a few of sentences description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!
    The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as educators. Institutions must consider the unique value that each adds to a world in which information is everywhere. In such a world, sense-making and the ability to assess the credibility of information are paramount. Mentoring and preparing students for the world in which they will live, the central role of the university when it achieved its modern form in the 14th century, is again at the forefront. Universities have always been seen as the gold standard for educational credentialing, but emerging certification programs from other sources are eroding the value of that mission daily. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I think this may be a bit ahead of the current thinking, but we're moving in that direction. We need to re-envision our roles not just as educators but as schools.cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011...or indeed as society as learning need not be confined to school, college or university.Gavin Feb 27, 2011oystein.johannessen Feb 27, 2011mscofino Feb 28, 2011 virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011 Now there is the open source university movement, http://www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses where students can learn from top universities how they see fit. There is also MOOC, http://www.emoderationskills.com/?p=312 These venues and many more redefining how students are educated.shelley.terrell Feb 28, 2011
    Computers as we know them are in the process of a massive reinvention. The computer is smaller, lighter, and better connected than ever before, without the need for wires or bulky peripherals. In many cases, smart phones and other mobile devices are sufficient for basic computing needs, and only specialized tasks require a keyboard, large monitor, and a mouse. Mobiles are connected to an ecosystem of applications supported by cloud computing technologies that can be downloaded and used instantly, for pennies. As the capabilities and interfaces of small computing devices improve, our ideas about when — or whether — a traditional computer is necessary are changing as well. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) Larry Feb 25, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 this is vital judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011The interface is also changing rapidly, connecting us more intimately with the machine. Now gesture-based interface is almost ubiquotous, and very soon the brain interface that is being launched in the gaming industry will soon become a reality as well. And we see the trend towards Smart Computing with Anywhere Computing in real time trough sensors and personalized decision enginesclaus.gregersen Feb 27, 2011
    Devices like Apple's iPad are filling a niche that is neither 'big smart phone' or 'small laptop.' As more people use, and discuss the ways they are finding to use, devices like the iPad, it is becoming clear that these are neither oversized phones nor stripped-down laptops. Instead, they represent a new class of devices that perhaps we were not even aware we wanted until they became available — and almost ubiquitous. They are more and more commonly seen, and are already gaining a footing in education, the health industry, and other sectors as tools for learning and for serious work. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) Larry Feb 25, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011limad Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 horncheah Feb 26, 2011guus Feb 27, 2011julie.hoo Feb 28, 2011...A critical difference here is that the slate computer of surface reinforces the social aspect of learning. No longer need you be sitting "behind" a screen and learning, but it can be laid flat and shared easily, and increasingly intuitively between groups of learners.Gavin Feb 27, 2011 alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011
    People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want to. Life in an increasingly busy world where learners must balance demands from home, work, school, and family poses a host of logistical challenges with which today’s ever more mobile students must cope. A faster approach is often perceived as a better approach, and as such people want easy and timely access not only to the information on the network, but to their social networks that can help them to interpret it and maximize its value. The implications for informal learning are profound, as are the notions of “just-in-time” learning and “found” learning, both ways of maximizing the impact of learning by ensuring it is timely and efficient. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) Larry Feb 25, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 boundaries between formal and informal learning are being completely blurred judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I would echo what Jan said. cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 Ditto.jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 horncheah Feb 26, 2011guus Feb 27, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011 alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011. Yes, and as technology increasingly allows this more modalities for learning, sabbaticals, gap years, learning not tied to a fixed school year and place. julie.hoo Feb 28, 2011 Yes, we will move from formal and ifnformal learning towards Pervasive Education.claus.gregersen Feb 27, 2011I second everything about lines being blurred between formal and informalrob.ackerman Feb 27, 2011 I agree there will be movement from formal to informal learning and I would also go a step further and suggest that learning opportunities will be designed for outsides the four walls of the classroom in project-based learning teams which will reconnect in the community center (school building) during scheduled periods at specific times. lynn.nolan Feb 27, 2011 virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011
    The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based, and our notions of IT support are decentralized. The continuing acceptance and adoption of cloud-based applications and services is changing not only the ways we configure and use software and file storage, but even how we conceptualize those functions. It does not matter where our work is stored; what matters is that our information is accessible no matter where we are or what device we choose to use. Globally, in huge numbers, we are growing used to a model of browser-based software that is device-independent. While some challenges still remain, specifically with notions of privacy and control, the promise of significant cost savings is an important driver in the search for solutions. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List)chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011 limad Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011claus.gregersen Feb 27, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011garry.putland Mar 2, 2011
    There is a growing willingness on the part of administrators to consider new approaches to combining face-to-face and technology-assisted instruction. While blended methods of instruction have been part of the toolset available to faculty for over two decades, they are becoming increasingly common. Older students with jobs and families, and students who live in remote locations that prevent regular on-campus attendance, have long sought alternative means of attending courses. Today we are seeing a growing number of conventional students opting for blended classes, and remote instruction is also seen as a viable means of supporting increasingly large survey courses that cannot be accommodated in existing classroom spaces. For these and other reasons, administrators are more interested than ever in these kinds of approaches. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) Larry Feb 25, 2011will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 The problem is that these blended classes, for the most part, are still traditional content, curriculum and pedagogy just in a digital form. So, the willingness comes from not really having to change anything. cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 I totally agree. Until now, we are replicating the current model, only changing the medium. This reinforces the challenge we have to see education in an innovative way.
    Blogs, open textbooks, electronic journals, and forms of expression embodied in new media formats are challenging the notions of academic writing. These techniques are increasingly common and are readily accepted as informal outlets for scholarly work. A more gradual trend toward official acceptance is moving slowly, but its stirrings are visible in the adoption of electronic content, experiments with crowd-sourcing, and open, online peer review of scholarly work. This trend is related to the challenge of developing metrics for evaluating such work, noted in 2010 as well as again this year. (Based on a trend from 2011 Horizon Report Short List) I think these areas are poised to have a more significant impact in the near future. It may impact higher ed more, but I can see it affecting K12 as well. KeeneH Feb 25, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 We can only hope.cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011 Our policies in district limit teachers' copyright. In this new collaborative web 2.0 world, I think this is an area we need to revisit. alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011 virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011
    The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured. This trend is being driven by the increasingly global and cooperative nature of business interactions facilitated by Internet technologies. The days of isolated desk jobs are disappearing, giving way to models in which teams work actively together to address issues too far-reaching or complex for a single worker to resolve alone. While this trend is not widespread, where schools have created a climate in which students, their peers, and their teachers are all working towards the same goals, where research is something open even to first year students, the results have shown tantalizing promise. Over the past few years, the emergence of a raft of new (and often free) tools has made collaboration easier than at any other point in history. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) Larry Feb 25, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011
    Web 2.0 tools are re-defining the way we live, work and play. Users of Web 2.0 tools tend to have to collaborate when using the tools. If we want our students to collaborate locally and internationally and develop collaborative skills, using these tools is a natural fit. limad Feb 26, 2011 The Web 2.0 tools also provide opportunites for communication, critical thinking and problem solving collaboratively across boundaries which advance our skills of communication. lynn.nolan Feb 27, 2011
    Unbundling Presently credentials such as diplomas are based primarily on "seat time" with an adequate class grade. For critical professions like Nurse or Aircraft Pilot, a proficiency exam is required because the diploma by itself isn't sufficient. Unbundling credential from instruction changes the framework entirely. There is a trend toward tying credentials to proficiency assessment rather than seat time. Examples are professional licensure (above), technical certifications (e.g. MCP/MCSE/CCNA), GED and so forth. The "Merit Badge" metaphor is often used when unbundling proficiency certification from learning -- particularly when applied to the K-12 space. Unbundling has many advantages. It makes clear exactly what's expected, it allows flexibility for the student to choose a learning method best suited to his/her needs and it supports independent pacing. Most importantly, in creates an environment that supports rapid innovation.brandt.redd Feb 24, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I think this will be a huge trend moving forward, one that schools will resist as they can.cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 I'd love to see this happen soon. alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011
    As IT support becomes more and more decentralized, the technologies we use are increasingly based not on school servers, but in the cloud. The continuing acceptance and adoption of cloud-based applications and services is changing not only the ways we configure and use software and file storage, but even how we conceptualize those functions. It does not matter where our work is stored; what matters is that our information is accessible no matter where we are or what device we choose to use. Globally, in huge numbers, we are growing used to a model of browser-based software that is device-independent. While some challenges still remain, specifically with notions of privacy and control, the promise of significant cost savings is an important driver in the search for solutions. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)limad Feb 26, 2011 this is a trned, though I still worry about security and privacy of student and teacher data. alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011
    It becomes more and more evident every year that students are not deeply engaged in learning at school. Studies have shown that this lack of engagement contributes to the rate of early dropouts, yet students still struggle to find personal relevance in much of what they are asked to do in school. Efforts to alter this trend, such as project- or challenge-based learning pilot programs, mentoring, and community involvement in learning, show promise. Even with these positive steps, it is clear that this trend will not be an easy one to reverse. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report) Larry Feb 25, 2011chris.brown Feb 25, 2011jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011limad Feb 26, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 Amen.cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 Hence the need to combine formal and informal learning opportunities. alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011 I am not sure if students 30 yrs ago were engaged either. . but today's students demand it since the disconnect between school and outside school is so pronouncedrob.ackerman Feb 27, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011
    The perceived value of innovation and creativity is increasing. Innovation is valued at the highest levels of business and must be embraced in schools if students are to succeed beyond their formal education. The ways we design learning experiences must reflect the growing importance of innovation and creativity as professional skills. Innovation and creativity must not be linked only to arts subjects, either; these skills are equally important in scientific inquiry, entrepreneurship, and other areas as well. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)limad Feb 26, 2011jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011 horncheah Feb 26, 2011kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011 virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011
    Technology continues to profoundly affect the way we work, collaborate, communicate, and succeed. Information technologies impact how people work, play, learn, socialize, and collaborate. Increasingly, technology skills are also critical to success in almost every arena, and those who are more facile with technology will advance while those without access or skills will not. The digital divide, once seen as a factor of wealth, is now seen as a factor of education: those who have the opportunity to learn technology skills are in a better position to obtain and make use of technology than those who do not. Evolving occupations, multiple careers, and an increasingly mobile workforce contribute to this trend. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)Larry Feb 25, 2011 KeeneH Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011will.richardson Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011guus Feb 27, 2011 alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011
    Technology is increasingly a means for empowering students, a method for communication and socializing, and a ubiquitous, transparent part of their lives. Technology is impacting our lives, and the lives of students, in new and expanding ways. Once seen as an isolating influence, technology is now recognized as a primary way to stay in touch and take control of one’s own learning. Multisensory, ubiquitous, and interdisciplinary, technology is integrated into nearly everything we do. It gives students a public voice and a means to reach beyond the classroom for interaction and exploration. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report) Larry Feb 25, 2011 Being in touch with all the senses has become a critical component of learning judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011limad Feb 26, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011guus Feb 27, 2011
    There is increasing interest in just-in-time, alternate, or non-formal avenues of education, such as online learning, mentoring, and independent study. More and more, the notion of the school as the seat of educational practice is changing as learners avail themselves of learning opportunities from other sources. There is a tremendous opportunity for schools to work hand-in-hand with alternate sources, and to examine traditional approaches and re-evaluate the content and experiences they are able to offer. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 horncheah Feb 26, 2011 alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 This new generation is used to being able to give opinions, customize their online experience, participate actively in activities, have flexible tools. They're having a hard time working in a fixed system that imposes only one way of doing things, and in which they can participate very little. They are expected to receive more than to give.garry.putland Mar 2, 2011
    The way we think of learning environments is changing. Traditionally, a learning environment has been a physical space, but the idea of what constitutes a learning environment is changing. The “spaces” where students learn are becoming more community-driven, interdisciplinary, and supported by technologies that engage virtual communication and collaboration. This changing concept of the learning environment has clear implications for schools, where learning is the key focus of the space. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report) Larry Feb 25, 2011jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011 There are many malls in America that are becoming empty and here in China there are a number of buildings that often sit empty, too....what if these small shops inside these malls and buildings had a 'shop name' like: Writers Abode, The Coffee Shop of Presentation Skills, The Library of Science Labs, Interact with the World, MathLand, Service Work, etc. Here the high school students shop at the mall, taking menus/pamphlets that show the length of the class, days it meets, expectations , cost, etc. which allows students to choose their learning journey and allows for greater socialization. (michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011) virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011
    There are voices amoung us. Innovative and creative researchers and authors continue to bring forward new models of theory and practice. Some examples include: Education Unbound: The Promise and Practice of Greenfiled Schooling by Frederick M. Hess, Fires in the Mind by Kathleen Cushman, What Technology Wants by Kevin Kelly, Education Nation by Milton Chen, Social Network Theory and Educational Change edited by Alan Daly, Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky, Disrupting Class by Clayton M. Christensen.jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 KeeneH Feb 25, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I'm not sure any of these address in any detail a fundamental re-envisioning of education, however.
    World-wide access to education, including high quality tertiary education and professional credentials are becoming more widespread. While the US still holds an advantage as the teritary destination of choice, this is rapidly changing as other countries seek to build their own capacity. In K12, it is already quite clear from PISA and other data that many countries are investing more and more effectively in the education of their future workforce. Online modalitites will only speed these changes. This will continue to reshape economic and political fortunes throughout the world.chris.brown Feb 25, 2011
    As it becomes understood by more people the technium (eco system of co-dependent technologies) which Keven Kelly identifies as the 7th Kingdom has great potential of impacting the core mission of education. He discusses that we can better be prepared for what is to come, we can better educate our child in the appropriate skills and literacies needed for thiving, we will have better tools for forecasting, and better ways to anticipate ordained trends.jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011
    Information Curation. World-wide access to information is challenging the knowledge teachers and students have about how to search. Increasingly Google is the lens through which studnts view the world. It is comforting to be able to 'google' an answer quickly, but knowledge of how to find, filter, and focus is not always embedded in the learning sequence developed by teachers. Added to this is the need to be able to distill chatter in real-time web. From simple search refinement strategies and choosing the right search tool, to Howard Rheingold's 'crap detection' and finally to understanding the implications of evolving semantic search, K-12 education needs to become more responsive to the online environment of information seeking. http://lifehacker.com/#!5739284/the-best-ways-to-tweak-your-search-when-google-doesnt-give-you-what-you-want http://oreilly.com/catalog/0636920015024 http://uxmag.com/technology/curators-of-the-real-time-web?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UXM+(UX+Magazine)&utm_content=Google+Reader judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011 horncheah Feb 26, 2011 will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 Speaks to NCTE literacies as well.jan.morrison Feb 27, 2011
    Deep but narrow. The lack of time coupled with the overwhelming amount of information have a tendency to restrict the exposure to information/knowledge to a limited range of sources. It also makes the consolidation of ideas difficult as there is little time to do so. We simply replace new information with newer information, usually from the same sources. While it is important to develop the capability to cull information etc, this probably need to be supported by technologies that can help to filter such information reasonably objectively. horncheah Feb 26, 2011
    Gaming. Would love to see new, interacitve educational games that create a new experience for learners...similar what Wii did. Presently, most educational games are merely entertaining multiple choice questions with a few graphics. We need something that is as fun as what is found in the iTunes App store. What if the titles were: Angry Birds Kills the Comma; World of WarCapitals; Nuke the Cells, Mr. Ahh Goes to the European Union, Fruit Ninja Chops the Passive Verb, etc.? And more importantly, create the same excitement in these programs that exist in the present apps. These new educational apps need to focus on teaching “skills” we hope students would learn during our class instruction. Having these apps perhaps, would allow us (teachers) more time in class to focus on concepts, not content. (michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011)jan.morrison Feb 27, 2011
    Blended Learning. As we move away from the egg-crate K-12 design, we could build modules that allow for a mixture of experiences and online learning. In these modules, students sign up for an experience. Examples include: Learn Your Government in Washington D.C.; Volunteer in Your Community; Grow A Garden; Create Your Own Widget. Once students make a selection, depending on their location, interest group, cultural interest, etc., students would would work online together sharing their own projects/problems/solutions.....then, design a portion of the module that allows students to pull together in the same city, spend a few days together. Maybe the group meets together first in a nearby city with the facilitator, review the course, bond, and then return home to complete the module. Later, there is a reunion, sharing of work. In other words, this blended learning experience creates a wider choice of courses for students and experiences that are outside the 4-walls. (michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011)
    Convergence. Not only will we see a convergence of tools in the next five years, we will also hopefully see a convergence of disciplines, cultures, and many other areas we have been claiming there have been convergences for the past decade. lynn.nolan Feb 27, 2011 (michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011)
    Reversed Mentorship. The traditional role of teacher to student is shifting in that students come to school knowing more than teachers in certain areas because of anytime / anyplace learning. Classrooms will shift to communities of learning. Everyone will bring what they know and can do to the table and teach each other. Teachers will be co-learners and students will be co-teachers. The era of thinking of teacher as knowledge giver will be replaced with a pot luck dinner model. Each person brings what they know and everyone shares in the learning. sheryl.nusbaum-beach Feb 28, 2011
    Rethinking Publishing. Book publishing was built on scarcity. Now that scarcity of information not longer exists will book publishing be more of a personal or collaborative knowledge construction exercise. Will books become one more prototype as people transparently share their thinking and process. Will books become more video driven and include visits from hollograms and other 3-D video options-- think Harry Potter. Because of the ease of self-publishing will essays and other text driven projects become e-books that line the shelves of a classroom. Will student voice in books become as important as seasoned experts? Will this trend create potential for governmental abuses such as New Speak (1984)? Will books become mere idea holders or ways to claim first to the space? As Kindles become the norm in classrooms will tools be available to self publish right to the Kindle and then the book becomes available for download instantly around the world. A child that writes a poem becomes a published poet within minutes and revisions/corrections of written works are applied in minutes as global audiences weigh in with suggestions or grammar corrections. Or because of the differences in spelling in different parts of the world will spelling loose it's importance in published works? Will electronic characteristics be given to paper so that we can still hold books and yet have all the benefits of immediate update and visual media embedded? (think Harry Potter). sheryl.nusbaum-beach Feb 28, 2011
    1-to-1 computing: I am not sure if this qualifies as a trend in the context of the Horizon report, but shouldn´t we list 1-to-1 computing as one of the obvious trends worldwide? This phenomenon has spread to a large number of countries and regions. So I think we should put in on the list.oystein.johannessen Feb 27, 2011 mscofino Feb 28, 2011 1 to 1 is very expensive to sustain and until we are willing to fund education fully, this will not become a reality for most districts. We need to think of 1to1 now as students briniging their own devices to school. Then we must arrange our schools to handle the various technologies that will come. alice.owenalice.owen Feb 27, 2011chris.brown Feb 28, 2011shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011 I actually think the trend is 1: many, particularly if students are bringing smart-phones into schools. The costs to school systems should actually reduce because of the cost shift to parents. So as the cost comes down, and the increasing sophistication continues to grow students will have access to form factors such as laptop, tablet and phone. Smart governments will subsidise (through tax breaks or grants to disadvantaged families) devices that can be used in schools for learning.garry.putland Mar 2, 2011

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  10. page TopicsNav edited Horizon Topics 3D Printing 3D Video Alternative Licensing Augmented Reality Brain-Computer …

    Horizon Topics
    3D Printing
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    Alternative Licensing
    Augmented Reality
    Brain-Computer Interfaces
    Cellular Networks
    Cloud Computing
    Collaborative Environments
    Collective Intelligence
    Context-Awareness
    Digital Identity
    Electronic Books
    Game-Based Learning
    Geolocation
    Gesture-Based Computing
    Learning Analytics
    Learning Objects
    Location-Based Services
    Mobiles
    New Scholarship
    Online Communication
    Open Content
    Personal Learning Environments
    Semantic Web
    Smart Classrooms
    Smart Objects
    Social Media
    Social Networking
    Statistical Machine Translation
    Tagging
    Telepresence
    Thin Film Displays
    Virtual Worlds
    Visual Data Analysis
    Web Aggregation Tools
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