Research Question 4: Key Trends

What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the ways in which learning-focused institutions approach our core missions of teaching, research, and service?

INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).

Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: - Larry Larry Jan 27, 2010


Compose your entries like this:
  • Trend Name. Add your ideas here with a few of sentences description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!

  • The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as educators. Institutions must consider the unique value that each adds to a world in which information is everywhere. In such a world, sense-making and the ability to assess the credibility of information are paramount. Mentoring and preparing students for the world in which they will live, the central role of the university when it achieved its modern form in the 14th century, is again at the forefront. Universities have always been seen as the gold standard for educational credentialing, but emerging certification programs from other sources are eroding the value of that mission daily. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I think this may be a bit ahead of the current thinking, but we're moving in that direction. We need to re-envision our roles not just as educators but as schools.- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011...or indeed as society as learning need not be confined to school, college or university.- Gavin Gavin Feb 27, 2011- oystein.johannessen oystein.johannessen Feb 27, 2011- mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011 - virginie.aimard virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011 Now there is the open source university movement, http://www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses where students can learn from top universities how they see fit. There is also MOOC, http://www.emoderationskills.com/?p=312 These venues and many more redefining how students are educated.- shelley.terrell shelley.terrell Feb 28, 2011
  • Computers as we know them are in the process of a massive reinvention. The computer is smaller, lighter, and better connected than ever before, without the need for wires or bulky peripherals. In many cases, smart phones and other mobile devices are sufficient for basic computing needs, and only specialized tasks require a keyboard, large monitor, and a mouse. Mobiles are connected to an ecosystem of applications supported by cloud computing technologies that can be downloaded and used instantly, for pennies. As the capabilities and interfaces of small computing devices improve, our ideas about when — or whether — a traditional computer is necessary are changing as well. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 this is vital - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - jeanne.century jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011The interface is also changing rapidly, connecting us more intimately with the machine. Now gesture-based interface is almost ubiquotous, and very soon the brain interface that is being launched in the gaming industry will soon become a reality as well. And we see the trend towards Smart Computing with Anywhere Computing in real time trough sensors and personalized decision engines- claus.gregersen claus.gregersen Feb 27, 2011
  • Devices like Apple's iPad are filling a niche that is neither 'big smart phone' or 'small laptop.' As more people use, and discuss the ways they are finding to use, devices like the iPad, it is becoming clear that these are neither oversized phones nor stripped-down laptops. Instead, they represent a new class of devices that perhaps we were not even aware we wanted until they became available — and almost ubiquitous. They are more and more commonly seen, and are already gaining a footing in education, the health industry, and other sectors as tools for learning and for serious work. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- limad limad Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 - horncheah horncheah Feb 26, 2011- guus guus Feb 27, 2011- julie.hoo julie.hoo Feb 28, 2011...A critical difference here is that the slate computer of surface reinforces the social aspect of learning. No longer need you be sitting "behind" a screen and learning, but it can be laid flat and shared easily, and increasingly intuitively between groups of learners.- Gavin Gavin Feb 27, 2011 alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011- kari.stubbs kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011- shafika.isaacs shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011
  • People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want to. Life in an increasingly busy world where learners must balance demands from home, work, school, and family poses a host of logistical challenges with which today’s ever more mobile students must cope. A faster approach is often perceived as a better approach, and as such people want easy and timely access not only to the information on the network, but to their social networks that can help them to interpret it and maximize its value. The implications for informal learning are profound, as are the notions of “just-in-time” learning and “found” learning, both ways of maximizing the impact of learning by ensuring it is timely and efficient. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 boundaries between formal and informal learning are being completely blurred - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I would echo what Jan said. - cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 Ditto.- jeanne.century jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 - horncheah horncheah Feb 26, 2011- guus guus Feb 27, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011 alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011- kari.stubbs kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011. Yes, and as technology increasingly allows this more modalities for learning, sabbaticals, gap years, learning not tied to a fixed school year and place. - julie.hoo julie.hoo Feb 28, 2011 Yes, we will move from formal and ifnformal learning towards Pervasive Education.- claus.gregersen claus.gregersen Feb 27, 2011I second everything about lines being blurred between formal and informal- rob.ackerman rob.ackerman Feb 27, 2011 I agree there will be movement from formal to informal learning and I would also go a step further and suggest that learning opportunities will be designed for outsides the four walls of the classroom in project-based learning teams which will reconnect in the community center (school building) during scheduled periods at specific times. - lynn.nolan lynn.nolan Feb 27, 2011 - virginie.aimard virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011
  • The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based, and our notions of IT support are decentralized. The continuing acceptance and adoption of cloud-based applications and services is changing not only the ways we configure and use software and file storage, but even how we conceptualize those functions. It does not matter where our work is stored; what matters is that our information is accessible no matter where we are or what device we choose to use. Globally, in huge numbers, we are growing used to a model of browser-based software that is device-independent. While some challenges still remain, specifically with notions of privacy and control, the promise of significant cost savings is an important driver in the search for solutions. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List)- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011 - limad limad Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011- claus.gregersen claus.gregersen Feb 27, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011- garry.putland garry.putland Mar 2, 2011
  • There is a growing willingness on the part of administrators to consider new approaches to combining face-to-face and technology-assisted instruction. While blended methods of instruction have been part of the toolset available to faculty for over two decades, they are becoming increasingly common. Older students with jobs and families, and students who live in remote locations that prevent regular on-campus attendance, have long sought alternative means of attending courses. Today we are seeing a growing number of conventional students opting for blended classes, and remote instruction is also seen as a viable means of supporting increasingly large survey courses that cannot be accommodated in existing classroom spaces. For these and other reasons, administrators are more interested than ever in these kinds of approaches. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 The problem is that these blended classes, for the most part, are still traditional content, curriculum and pedagogy just in a digital form. So, the willingness comes from not really having to change anything. - cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 I totally agree. Until now, we are replicating the current model, only changing the medium. This reinforces the challenge we have to see education in an innovative way.
  • Blogs, open textbooks, electronic journals, and forms of expression embodied in new media formats are challenging the notions of academic writing. These techniques are increasingly common and are readily accepted as informal outlets for scholarly work. A more gradual trend toward official acceptance is moving slowly, but its stirrings are visible in the adoption of electronic content, experiments with crowd-sourcing, and open, online peer review of scholarly work. This trend is related to the challenge of developing metrics for evaluating such work, noted in 2010 as well as again this year. (Based on a trend from 2011 Horizon Report Short List) I think these areas are poised to have a more significant impact in the near future. It may impact higher ed more, but I can see it affecting K12 as well. - KeeneH KeeneH Feb 25, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 We can only hope.- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011 Our policies in district limit teachers' copyright. In this new collaborative web 2.0 world, I think this is an area we need to revisit. alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011- kari.stubbs kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011 - virginie.aimard virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011- shafika.isaacs shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011
  • The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured. This trend is being driven by the increasingly global and cooperative nature of business interactions facilitated by Internet technologies. The days of isolated desk jobs are disappearing, giving way to models in which teams work actively together to address issues too far-reaching or complex for a single worker to resolve alone. While this trend is not widespread, where schools have created a climate in which students, their peers, and their teachers are all working towards the same goals, where research is something open even to first year students, the results have shown tantalizing promise. Over the past few years, the emergence of a raft of new (and often free) tools has made collaboration easier than at any other point in history. (From 2011 Horizon Report Short List) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - virginie.aimard virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011
  • Web 2.0 tools are re-defining the way we live, work and play. Users of Web 2.0 tools tend to have to collaborate when using the tools. If we want our students to collaborate locally and internationally and develop collaborative skills, using these tools is a natural fit. - limad limad Feb 26, 2011 The Web 2.0 tools also provide opportunites for communication, critical thinking and problem solving collaboratively across boundaries which advance our skills of communication. - lynn.nolan lynn.nolan Feb 27, 2011
  • Unbundling Presently credentials such as diplomas are based primarily on "seat time" with an adequate class grade. For critical professions like Nurse or Aircraft Pilot, a proficiency exam is required because the diploma by itself isn't sufficient. Unbundling credential from instruction changes the framework entirely. There is a trend toward tying credentials to proficiency assessment rather than seat time. Examples are professional licensure (above), technical certifications (e.g. MCP/MCSE/CCNA), GED and so forth. The "Merit Badge" metaphor is often used when unbundling proficiency certification from learning -- particularly when applied to the K-12 space. Unbundling has many advantages. It makes clear exactly what's expected, it allows flexibility for the student to choose a learning method best suited to his/her needs and it supports independent pacing. Most importantly, in creates an environment that supports rapid innovation.- brandt.redd brandt.redd Feb 24, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I think this will be a huge trend moving forward, one that schools will resist as they can.- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 I'd love to see this happen soon. alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011
  • As IT support becomes more and more decentralized, the technologies we use are increasingly based not on school servers, but in the cloud. The continuing acceptance and adoption of cloud-based applications and services is changing not only the ways we configure and use software and file storage, but even how we conceptualize those functions. It does not matter where our work is stored; what matters is that our information is accessible no matter where we are or what device we choose to use. Globally, in huge numbers, we are growing used to a model of browser-based software that is device-independent. While some challenges still remain, specifically with notions of privacy and control, the promise of significant cost savings is an important driver in the search for solutions. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)- limad limad Feb 26, 2011 this is a trned, though I still worry about security and privacy of student and teacher data. alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011
  • It becomes more and more evident every year that students are not deeply engaged in learning at school. Studies have shown that this lack of engagement contributes to the rate of early dropouts, yet students still struggle to find personal relevance in much of what they are asked to do in school. Efforts to alter this trend, such as project- or challenge-based learning pilot programs, mentoring, and community involvement in learning, show promise. Even with these positive steps, it is clear that this trend will not be an easy one to reverse. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- limad limad Feb 26, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 Amen.- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 Hence the need to combine formal and informal learning opportunities. alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011- kari.stubbs kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011 I am not sure if students 30 yrs ago were engaged either. . but today's students demand it since the disconnect between school and outside school is so pronounced- rob.ackerman rob.ackerman Feb 27, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011
  • The perceived value of innovation and creativity is increasing. Innovation is valued at the highest levels of business and must be embraced in schools if students are to succeed beyond their formal education. The ways we design learning experiences must reflect the growing importance of innovation and creativity as professional skills. Innovation and creativity must not be linked only to arts subjects, either; these skills are equally important in scientific inquiry, entrepreneurship, and other areas as well. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)- limad limad Feb 26, 2011- jeanne.century jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011 - horncheah horncheah Feb 26, 2011- kari.stubbs kari.stubbs Feb 27, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011 - virginie.aimard virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011- shafika.isaacs shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011
  • Technology continues to profoundly affect the way we work, collaborate, communicate, and succeed. Information technologies impact how people work, play, learn, socialize, and collaborate. Increasingly, technology skills are also critical to success in almost every arena, and those who are more facile with technology will advance while those without access or skills will not. The digital divide, once seen as a factor of wealth, is now seen as a factor of education: those who have the opportunity to learn technology skills are in a better position to obtain and make use of technology than those who do not. Evolving occupations, multiple careers, and an increasingly mobile workforce contribute to this trend. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)- Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011 - KeeneH KeeneH Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011- jeanne.century jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011- guus guus Feb 27, 2011 alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011
  • Technology is increasingly a means for empowering students, a method for communication and socializing, and a ubiquitous, transparent part of their lives. Technology is impacting our lives, and the lives of students, in new and expanding ways. Once seen as an isolating influence, technology is now recognized as a primary way to stay in touch and take control of one’s own learning. Multisensory, ubiquitous, and interdisciplinary, technology is integrated into nearly everything we do. It gives students a public voice and a means to reach beyond the classroom for interaction and exploration. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011 Being in touch with all the senses has become a critical component of learning - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- limad limad Feb 26, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011- jeanne.century jeanne.century Feb 26, 2011- guus guus Feb 27, 2011
  • There is increasing interest in just-in-time, alternate, or non-formal avenues of education, such as online learning, mentoring, and independent study. More and more, the notion of the school as the seat of educational practice is changing as learners avail themselves of learning opportunities from other sources. There is a tremendous opportunity for schools to work hand-in-hand with alternate sources, and to examine traditional approaches and re-evaluate the content and experiences they are able to offer. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report)- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - horncheah horncheah Feb 26, 2011 - alec.couros alec.couros Feb 26, 2011 This new generation is used to being able to give opinions, customize their online experience, participate actively in activities, have flexible tools. They're having a hard time working in a fixed system that imposes only one way of doing things, and in which they can participate very little. They are expected to receive more than to give.- garry.putland garry.putland Mar 2, 2011
  • The way we think of learning environments is changing. Traditionally, a learning environment has been a physical space, but the idea of what constitutes a learning environment is changing. The “spaces” where students learn are becoming more community-driven, interdisciplinary, and supported by technologies that engage virtual communication and collaboration. This changing concept of the learning environment has clear implications for schools, where learning is the key focus of the space. (From 2010 K12 Horizon Report) - Larry Larry Feb 25, 2011- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011- cristiana.mattos cristiana.mattos Feb 26, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011 There are many malls in America that are becoming empty and here in China there are a number of buildings that often sit empty, too....what if these small shops inside these malls and buildings had a 'shop name' like: Writers Abode, The Coffee Shop of Presentation Skills, The Library of Science Labs, Interact with the World, MathLand, Service Work, etc. Here the high school students shop at the mall, taking menus/pamphlets that show the length of the class, days it meets, expectations , cost, etc. which allows students to choose their learning journey and allows for greater socialization. (- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011) - virginie.aimard virginie.aimard Feb 28, 2011
  • There are voices amoung us. Innovative and creative researchers and authors continue to bring forward new models of theory and practice. Some examples include: Education Unbound: The Promise and Practice of Greenfiled Schooling by Frederick M. Hess, Fires in the Mind by Kathleen Cushman, What Technology Wants by Kevin Kelly, Education Nation by Milton Chen, Social Network Theory and Educational Change edited by Alan Daly, Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky, Disrupting Class by Clayton M. Christensen.- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011 - KeeneH KeeneH Feb 25, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 I'm not sure any of these address in any detail a fundamental re-envisioning of education, however.
  • World-wide access to education, including high quality tertiary education and professional credentials are becoming more widespread. While the US still holds an advantage as the teritary destination of choice, this is rapidly changing as other countries seek to build their own capacity. In K12, it is already quite clear from PISA and other data that many countries are investing more and more effectively in the education of their future workforce. Online modalitites will only speed these changes. This will continue to reshape economic and political fortunes throughout the world.- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 25, 2011
  • As it becomes understood by more people the technium (eco system of co-dependent technologies) which Keven Kelly identifies as the 7th Kingdom has great potential of impacting the core mission of education. He discusses that we can better be prepared for what is to come, we can better educate our child in the appropriate skills and literacies needed for thiving, we will have better tools for forecasting, and better ways to anticipate ordained trends.- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 25, 2011
  • Information Curation. World-wide access to information is challenging the knowledge teachers and students have about how to search. Increasingly Google is the lens through which studnts view the world. It is comforting to be able to 'google' an answer quickly, but knowledge of how to find, filter, and focus is not always embedded in the learning sequence developed by teachers. Added to this is the need to be able to distill chatter in real-time web. From simple search refinement strategies and choosing the right search tool, to Howard Rheingold's 'crap detection' and finally to understanding the implications of evolving semantic search, K-12 education needs to become more responsive to the online environment of information seeking. http://lifehacker.com/#!5739284/the-best-ways-to-tweak-your-search-when-google-doesnt-give-you-what-you-want http://oreilly.com/catalog/0636920015024 http://uxmag.com/technology/curators-of-the-real-time-web?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UXM+(UX+Magazine)&utm_content=Google+Reader - judy.oconnell judy.oconnell Feb 26, 2011 - horncheah horncheah Feb 26, 2011 - will.richardson will.richardson Feb 26, 2011 Speaks to NCTE literacies as well.- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 27, 2011
  • Deep but narrow. The lack of time coupled with the overwhelming amount of information have a tendency to restrict the exposure to information/knowledge to a limited range of sources. It also makes the consolidation of ideas difficult as there is little time to do so. We simply replace new information with newer information, usually from the same sources. While it is important to develop the capability to cull information etc, this probably need to be supported by technologies that can help to filter such information reasonably objectively. - horncheah horncheah Feb 26, 2011
  • Gaming. Would love to see new, interacitve educational games that create a new experience for learners...similar what Wii did. Presently, most educational games are merely entertaining multiple choice questions with a few graphics. We need something that is as fun as what is found in the iTunes App store. What if the titles were: Angry Birds Kills the Comma; World of WarCapitals; Nuke the Cells, Mr. Ahh Goes to the European Union, Fruit Ninja Chops the Passive Verb, etc.? And more importantly, create the same excitement in these programs that exist in the present apps. These new educational apps need to focus on teaching “skills” we hope students would learn during our class instruction. Having these apps perhaps, would allow us (teachers) more time in class to focus on concepts, not content. (- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011)- jan.morrison jan.morrison Feb 27, 2011
  • Blended Learning. As we move away from the egg-crate K-12 design, we could build modules that allow for a mixture of experiences and online learning. In these modules, students sign up for an experience. Examples include: Learn Your Government in Washington D.C.; Volunteer in Your Community; Grow A Garden; Create Your Own Widget. Once students make a selection, depending on their location, interest group, cultural interest, etc., students would would work online together sharing their own projects/problems/solutions.....then, design a portion of the module that allows students to pull together in the same city, spend a few days together. Maybe the group meets together first in a nearby city with the facilitator, review the course, bond, and then return home to complete the module. Later, there is a reunion, sharing of work. In other words, this blended learning experience creates a wider choice of courses for students and experiences that are outside the 4-walls. (- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011)
  • Convergence. Not only will we see a convergence of tools in the next five years, we will also hopefully see a convergence of disciplines, cultures, and many other areas we have been claiming there have been convergences for the past decade. - lynn.nolan lynn.nolan Feb 27, 2011 (- michael.lambert michael.lambert Feb 27, 2011)
  • Reversed Mentorship. The traditional role of teacher to student is shifting in that students come to school knowing more than teachers in certain areas because of anytime / anyplace learning. Classrooms will shift to communities of learning. Everyone will bring what they know and can do to the table and teach each other. Teachers will be co-learners and students will be co-teachers. The era of thinking of teacher as knowledge giver will be replaced with a pot luck dinner model. Each person brings what they know and everyone shares in the learning. - sheryl.nusbaum-beach sheryl.nusbaum-beach Feb 28, 2011
  • Rethinking Publishing. Book publishing was built on scarcity. Now that scarcity of information not longer exists will book publishing be more of a personal or collaborative knowledge construction exercise. Will books become one more prototype as people transparently share their thinking and process. Will books become more video driven and include visits from hollograms and other 3-D video options-- think Harry Potter. Because of the ease of self-publishing will essays and other text driven projects become e-books that line the shelves of a classroom. Will student voice in books become as important as seasoned experts? Will this trend create potential for governmental abuses such as New Speak (1984)? Will books become mere idea holders or ways to claim first to the space? As Kindles become the norm in classrooms will tools be available to self publish right to the Kindle and then the book becomes available for download instantly around the world. A child that writes a poem becomes a published poet within minutes and revisions/corrections of written works are applied in minutes as global audiences weigh in with suggestions or grammar corrections. Or because of the differences in spelling in different parts of the world will spelling loose it's importance in published works? Will electronic characteristics be given to paper so that we can still hold books and yet have all the benefits of immediate update and visual media embedded? (think Harry Potter). - sheryl.nusbaum-beach sheryl.nusbaum-beach Feb 28, 2011
  • 1-to-1 computing: I am not sure if this qualifies as a trend in the context of the Horizon report, but shouldn´t we list 1-to-1 computing as one of the obvious trends worldwide? This phenomenon has spread to a large number of countries and regions. So I think we should put in on the list.- oystein.johannessen oystein.johannessen Feb 27, 2011 - mscofino mscofino Feb 28, 2011 1 to 1 is very expensive to sustain and until we are willing to fund education fully, this will not become a reality for most districts. We need to think of 1to1 now as students briniging their own devices to school. Then we must arrange our schools to handle the various technologies that will come. alice.owen- alice.owen alice.owen Feb 27, 2011- chris.brown chris.brown Feb 28, 2011- shafika.isaacs shafika.isaacs Feb 28, 2011 I actually think the trend is 1: many, particularly if students are bringing smart-phones into schools. The costs to school systems should actually reduce because of the cost shift to parents. So as the cost comes down, and the increasing sophistication continues to grow students will have access to form factors such as laptop, tablet and phone. Smart governments will subsidise (through tax breaks or grants to disadvantaged families) devices that can be used in schools for learning.- garry.putland garry.putland Mar 2, 2011